Immersive Arctic Experience At Room Temperature

March 2, 2012 § Leave a comment

The National Maritime Museum in London commissioned United Visual Artists (UVA), also widely know for their installation “Volume” in front of the Victor and Albert Museum, to develop the installation High Arctic “to understand, visualize and gain insight on the steadily vanishing region”. The result is an interactive experience that simulates various effects of climate change in an abstract environment. Set in the year 2100, the environment invites visitors to explore the sculptural landscape and a torch like device enables to direct interaction with installation and confronts the visitor with the negative impact humanity is having on this unique and highly sensitive eco-system.

As I might have mentioned before, I’m a sucker for this kind of impressive, high tech installations (although I also enjoy long walks on the beach and striking kittens). The futuristic and abstract character of the experience is definitely a welcome change and allows an entirely new access to the subject. Instead of focusing on sympathy, using pictures of cute animals to warn about the imminent destruction of this precious eco-system, the museum has opted for a presentation surface that’s much more daring and “out there”. It opens the discussion to a different audience and attracts visitors that might otherwise not care about a subject like the Arctic, if a more conventional approach (such as impressive photos) been chosen.
Maybe the impressive photo bit is part of the exhibition and can be found in another room. If somebody visits the exhibition, please let me know and leave a comment. I’m curious to know. Thanks!

(via Designboom)

Soccer inside Victoria Station, London

February 15, 2012 § Leave a comment

This staged soccer event set up by Samsung in London’s Victoria station is a good example of an engaging, cultural event that connects people around a given set of values. Samsung manages to create it in a public environment that is unconventional and unexpected yet free and entertaining. The audience, delighted by the distraction, is open to the suggested activity because the brand does not want to push a product. Instead the audience feels compelled to watch and share the fun with friends and family, using their mobile devices. A sense of excitement and fun  is in the air and the brand is the facilitator. Additionally the viral component will help transport the expereince to those who did not have a chance to be there in person.

More and more brands realize the power of these cultural events that don’t aim to push a product service but create awareness, engagement and potentially lead to brand loyalty. Though it will only work if the event is aligned with the brands values and is not a means to distract from product/service inherent problems. Before you invest into an activity like this, make sure you’re product service is top notch. NO cultural event can make up for a negative user/customer experience.

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