Stella Artois and Andy Cavatorta turn beer glasses into mindblowing music installations

March 6, 2014 § Leave a comment

We all have seen the odd piano, made of water glasses, filled to a different height to create different tone pitches. MIT sound inventor Andy Cavatorta teamed up with Stella Artois and indie rock band Cold War Kids to create the chalice Symphony. Several installations incorporating the iconic Stella Artois beer glasses were used to create a number of beautiful, iconic. yet functional pieces or art that are simultaneously musical instruments.
“Cavatorta has passionately pored over hundreds of the iconic Stella Artois Chalices to craft four fully-functional music instruments inspired by elements of the iconic glassware: the Hive, the Pryophone, the Star Harp and the Violina.”
Cold War Kids wrote a soulful song that incorporates the Chalice Symphony as main theme.

What a beautiful marriage of branded objects and a value driven intervention that is guaranteed to create tons of earned media for Stella Artois throughout all kinds of media and channels. It takes communicating Stella’s dedication to craftsmanship to a new level.

 

(via Trendland)

Coca Cola’s Urban Pop Up Park

October 24, 2013 § Leave a comment

Roll-Out-Happiness-Coca-Cola

As Coca Cola is moving from creative excellence to content excellence, the company has started to increase their output of cultured content. The “Roll Out Happiness” project is just one more in an interesting series of of non conventional interventions in public space that is value driven and not product based.

Aiming to create a surprise, offering a relaxed and inviting space in the public urban environment, the company developed a pop up park including grass, trees and huge pillows (in red of course) to entice passers by to take off their shoes and relax in an otherwise lifeless and nature deprived urban space.

Though I’m personally not a big fan of Coke, this intervention is very powerful because it doesn’t just embody Coca Cola’s new position so very good (bringing happiness to people), it offers a social/communal experience that engages all 5 senses, bringing people together and creating an unexpected little moment of fun and happiness.

The pop up character ensures an element of surprise and enables the brand to offer a polymorphic experience by moving the park and invading different spaces, creating new environments for different people – a good strategy to avoid that the experience becomes stale. The project could easily be extended, involving cultural and communal activities to make the place even more attractive, offering more reasons to come and hang out or even participate. It could turn the pop-up park into a destination beyond the initial novelty factor.

(via: TAXI)

An art gallery at 35,000ft

February 12, 2013 § Leave a comment

Virgin Atlantic teamed up with British artists Ben Eine to offer its “Upper Class” members an new in-flight service: viewing and potential purchase of one of ten of his trademark typography works, ranging form £2.500 – £15.000. “The Gallery in the Air” also offer a “behind the scene” look of the art works creation and lets passengers buy the art work just like any regular duty free item – well kind of…

“We have created a completely original way of appreciating and buying art – a new frontier for the industry.” the artists said. The collaboration is only a first in a series to follow.

The initiative is a great example of how a brand creates a surprising and remarkable experience for a selected group of their customers, enhancing the overall brand experience while simultaneously promoting art in general and particularly Eine and the British art scene. The artists and his art works were well chosen and represent the values of the brand perfectly: British, young, playful, and fun. Another great example of a brand using non-product/service related art to enhance the brand expereince. It  stimulates positive associations for the brand and creates positive word of mouth and free editorials along the way.

(via PSFK)

Discover how interactive art can alleviate suffering for children in a hospital waiting room

April 5, 2012 § Leave a comment

Imagine you’re 6 years old, you don’t feel well and your mom takes you to a hospital for the first time.

On top of really not feeling well, you’re in this unfamiliar and big scary place, not knowing what will happen to you. As you sit down in the waiting room you notice some colorful lines that move over the wall and you want to find out what this is all about. You discover you can actually play with the lines, move them around, and as you do that you hear sounds. Before you know it you make music and another kid you did not know before joins you and together you discover a new and exciting way to play and have fun with music. Suddenly the hospital doesn’t seem to scary anymore and you also think you feel much better.

Something along those lines must have been the thinking behind a new interactive wall at the Saint-Justine, a mother-children’s Hospital here in Montreal. In an attempt to make the waiting room area more inviting and less boring or scary, Montreal-based Moment Factory (who were also responsible for the spectacular visuals and stage design of Madonna’s  half time show at the Super Bowl) conceived this interactive wall, inviting children to discover their creative side, playing with sight, sounds, colors and movement. All this can be done by several children at the same time, enabling them to explore, discover and create  together.

What a great way to engage children around art in an environment that most of us associate with discomfort and suffering, creating new associations, potentially turning a hospital visit into a more positive and playful expereince, at least partly. Another inspiring example where art can improve the quality of life, and in return help the Saint-Justine Hospital to offer better services.

(via Grafika)

A Walk In The Park With An Orchestra, Dustin Hoffman, Christo and others

March 9, 2012 § 2 Comments

Personally I’m not a big fan of QR codes and start to get tired of them. But every now and again I come across a really great way to use them.

This award winning campaign by Magma, called “World Park” utilizes QR codes to help the visitor unlock park secrets, movie clips (shot at the exact location you’re at), historical documents and more. The 50 codes are placed all over the Central park in NYC, turning the park into one big fun-space to explore and discover it’s many gems and stories. Watch the girls from “Sex in the city” enjoying a stroll through the park. Listen to an orchestra that has long gone. Take a virtual walk through Christo’s bright orange gates for the first time, if you have missed the installation, when it was around.

The campaign, aimed at a younger audience, was activated through billiards and on social media, accompanied by world park t-shirts.

I really love the way QR codes are used for this campaign. It’s not about selling any thing, but creating an engaging experience that entertains and educates in a light way. A very inspirational project, not just because I started working on a park/garden project myself. It shows that the content you unlock is much more important for the success of your campaign than the inventive way of creating the QR codes (Lego, Oreo cookies, etc.)

Well done, Magma!

(via iMedia)

Immersive Arctic Experience At Room Temperature

March 2, 2012 § Leave a comment

The National Maritime Museum in London commissioned United Visual Artists (UVA), also widely know for their installation “Volume” in front of the Victor and Albert Museum, to develop the installation High Arctic “to understand, visualize and gain insight on the steadily vanishing region”. The result is an interactive experience that simulates various effects of climate change in an abstract environment. Set in the year 2100, the environment invites visitors to explore the sculptural landscape and a torch like device enables to direct interaction with installation and confronts the visitor with the negative impact humanity is having on this unique and highly sensitive eco-system.

As I might have mentioned before, I’m a sucker for this kind of impressive, high tech installations (although I also enjoy long walks on the beach and striking kittens). The futuristic and abstract character of the experience is definitely a welcome change and allows an entirely new access to the subject. Instead of focusing on sympathy, using pictures of cute animals to warn about the imminent destruction of this precious eco-system, the museum has opted for a presentation surface that’s much more daring and “out there”. It opens the discussion to a different audience and attracts visitors that might otherwise not care about a subject like the Arctic, if a more conventional approach (such as impressive photos) been chosen.
Maybe the impressive photo bit is part of the exhibition and can be found in another room. If somebody visits the exhibition, please let me know and leave a comment. I’m curious to know. Thanks!

(via Designboom)

Fabergé Invites to the Worlds Biggest Egg Hunt

February 29, 2012 § Leave a comment

Fabergé is inviting Londoners and tourist alike to participate in the biggest egg hunt ever. More then 200 eggs are located all over central London.

The company invited numerous artists (Marc Quinn, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Vivienne Westwood, etc.) to design eggs, which are placed throughout London for a limited time only. The website showcases all 209 eggs, gives clues, offers 12 maps, highlight related product information and entices the audience to participate in many other ways, such as Facebook  and Twitter.

Every egg comes with a unique keyword that enables the participant to enter a draw. Every egg found and every keywords entered increases the participant’s chances o win the big price: a special Diamond Jubilee Egg, valued at £100,000. A Facebook app offers another possibility to participate and enables Fabergé to interact more directly with the participants.

At the end of the hunt a “Golden Collection” of 30 eggs will be sold at live auction on 20 th March with the rest of the eggs auctioned off online here. All proceeds from the auction go to the charities Elephant Family and Action for Children.

Treasure hunts are nothing new and can fail miserable if poorly executed. But Fabergé has managed to capture our imagination, combining the creativity of internationally acclaimed designers, an attempt to brake a work record (for most participants in a life egg hunt), and raising money for a charitable reason. What a great idea! This is bound to generate a lot of earned media and word-of-mouth.
(If you’re happening to be bidding on an egg, let me know. I’d love to share your experience on here.)

(via Creative Review)

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the Cultural category at Brand Experience Strategies & Cultured Projects.

%d bloggers like this: